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100 responses to “Quick link: Matthew Ricketson on how the 24/7 media cycle helped overthrow Rudd”

  1. Katz

    The 24/7 tweet-now, think-later media omniverse is not the sole or even the biggest contributor [to Rudd’s demise].

    Hear, hear.

    So all that is left is for us to decide whether the media were the fifth, sixth, or seventh most important cause for the demise of Rudd.

    Any folks who still think the media were the most important (or only) cause should take it up with Matthew Ricketson who as a Professor of Journalism is prevented only be intellectual honesty from pushing that particular barrow.

  2. Katz

    The 24/7 tweet-now, think-later media omniverse is not the sole or even the biggest contributor [to Rudd’s demise].

    Hear, hear.

    So all that is left is for us to decide whether the media were the fifth, sixth, or seventh most important cause for the demise of Rudd.

    Any folks who still think the media were the most important (or only) cause should take it up with Matthew Ricketson who as a Professor of Journalism is prevented only be intellectual honesty from pushing that particular barrow.

  3. Sam

    The media didn’t create the abandonment of the CPRS, nor did it create the botched RSPT. Nor did the media create Rudd’s lack of interest in building relationships with his own colleagues.

    That was all his own work.

    And It wasn’t that the polls were bad (and recycled in the 24 hour media) that did Rudd in; it was that the polls were bad in the shadow of an election.

  4. Sam

    The media didn’t create the abandonment of the CPRS, nor did it create the botched RSPT. Nor did the media create Rudd’s lack of interest in building relationships with his own colleagues.

    That was all his own work.

    And It wasn’t that the polls were bad (and recycled in the 24 hour media) that did Rudd in; it was that the polls were bad in the shadow of an election.

  5. Mr Denmore

    Tim Dunlop writing on The Drum nails it much better, by pointing to the desperate tone of the ABC’s crowing of its “scoop” in breaking the news of the challenge.

    I’m a former finance journalist from the wire services. Fifteen years ago, the press gallery political journos used to mock our people in Canberra for shouting down brick-like mobile phones to editors filing “snaps” on what Ralph Willis or John Dawkins (or whoever the treasurer was at the time) had said about interest rates.

    Ninety nine per cent of the time these headlines flashed to the financial markets were statements of the bleeding obvious. But being a micro-second behind Bloomberg or Reuters or AP in breaking the news was enough to have you worrying about your future.

    I distinctly recall the political journos telling we finance scribes that what we did was pathetic.

    So it amused me greatly to see the regular press gallery now doing exactly the same thing, lined up on Sky reading twits on their mobile phones about the latest inside goss on the coming coup, and the ABC wetting itself over “breaking” a story that most people would have heard about within the hour anyway.

    It’s this climate of chest-beating definition of a scoop as beating someone by seconds over an event that falls into the media’s lap with no effort that encapsulates what’s wrong with the industry these days.

    In finance journalism, the urge for speed made some sense because billions were at stake in foreign exchange and bond markets. We all recalled Keating’s banana republic comment back in 1986 and its instant effect on the $A.

    But in political journalism what is it all about but gratifying the egos of the individual journos and using all the toys that instant communication involves?

    This has nothing – nothing – to do with the public interest. It merely creates a climate of over-excitability and fuels a noise-ridden political climate where policymakers feel under pressure to make instant and ill-considered decisions to feed an insatiable beast.

    It is a form of madness and a particularly worrying one, because the fourth estate traditionally prides itself on keeping a distance and a certain perspective on news events that provides context for its audience.

    This is not 24/7. It’s second by second. Time is compressed amid all the noise and people end up making bad decisions.

  6. Mr Denmore

    Tim Dunlop writing on The Drum nails it much better, by pointing to the desperate tone of the ABC’s crowing of its “scoop” in breaking the news of the challenge.

    I’m a former finance journalist from the wire services. Fifteen years ago, the press gallery political journos used to mock our people in Canberra for shouting down brick-like mobile phones to editors filing “snaps” on what Ralph Willis or John Dawkins (or whoever the treasurer was at the time) had said about interest rates.

    Ninety nine per cent of the time these headlines flashed to the financial markets were statements of the bleeding obvious. But being a micro-second behind Bloomberg or Reuters or AP in breaking the news was enough to have you worrying about your future.

    I distinctly recall the political journos telling we finance scribes that what we did was pathetic.

    So it amused me greatly to see the regular press gallery now doing exactly the same thing, lined up on Sky reading twits on their mobile phones about the latest inside goss on the coming coup, and the ABC wetting itself over “breaking” a story that most people would have heard about within the hour anyway.

    It’s this climate of chest-beating definition of a scoop as beating someone by seconds over an event that falls into the media’s lap with no effort that encapsulates what’s wrong with the industry these days.

    In finance journalism, the urge for speed made some sense because billions were at stake in foreign exchange and bond markets. We all recalled Keating’s banana republic comment back in 1986 and its instant effect on the $A.

    But in political journalism what is it all about but gratifying the egos of the individual journos and using all the toys that instant communication involves?

    This has nothing – nothing – to do with the public interest. It merely creates a climate of over-excitability and fuels a noise-ridden political climate where policymakers feel under pressure to make instant and ill-considered decisions to feed an insatiable beast.

    It is a form of madness and a particularly worrying one, because the fourth estate traditionally prides itself on keeping a distance and a certain perspective on news events that provides context for its audience.

    This is not 24/7. It’s second by second. Time is compressed amid all the noise and people end up making bad decisions.

  7. CMMC

    “news cycle” is a strange term for describing the constant trolling of made-up slurs and critiques that we now have.

    And they don’t even need to be discussed, just invoke them with the catch-all phrase “under pressure”.

    Rudd is “under pressure” to resolve the mining tax, Gillard is “under pressure” to resolve the mining tax. Pressure from….

    the constant trolling of made-up slurs and critiques that is composed by the “news cycle”.

  8. CMMC

    “news cycle” is a strange term for describing the constant trolling of made-up slurs and critiques that we now have.

    And they don’t even need to be discussed, just invoke them with the catch-all phrase “under pressure”.

    Rudd is “under pressure” to resolve the mining tax, Gillard is “under pressure” to resolve the mining tax. Pressure from….

    the constant trolling of made-up slurs and critiques that is composed by the “news cycle”.

  9. Mr Denmore

    CMMC, that’s exactly right. When you have a deadline very minute, you are continually seeking to throw the story forward. So you rejig your lead along these lines, revelling in the passive voice to save you having to identify the fact that nothing new has happened:

    “Pressure is expected to intensify today…”
    “The storm continues over…”
    “The party is seeking to come to terms with…”
    “Expectations are running high…”
    “The Opposition has thrown down the gauntlet…”
    “Questions are expected to be asked…”
    “New developments are expected today in the long-running…”

    And on and on and on it goes.

  10. Mr Denmore

    CMMC, that’s exactly right. When you have a deadline very minute, you are continually seeking to throw the story forward. So you rejig your lead along these lines, revelling in the passive voice to save you having to identify the fact that nothing new has happened:

    “Pressure is expected to intensify today…”
    “The storm continues over…”
    “The party is seeking to come to terms with…”
    “Expectations are running high…”
    “The Opposition has thrown down the gauntlet…”
    “Questions are expected to be asked…”
    “New developments are expected today in the long-running…”

    And on and on and on it goes.

  11. paul walter

    Yep, Mr. Denmore says it good. Rudd’s political survival depends on him eventually understanding what he was caught up in. If he’s still interested.
    I think someone writing for the Guardian was commenting about the accelerating speed of Australian political cycles the other, maybe Paola Totaro.
    At Online opinion”, Prof. Carol Johnson presented a short paper on Rudd as to temperament, a little harsh in parts, but on the whole a good thumbnail.
    After what happened to Rudd, you can see why Gillard is reluctant to give up her flat toosoon, lest she lose her humanity.

  12. paul walter

    Yep, Mr. Denmore says it good. Rudd’s political survival depends on him eventually understanding what he was caught up in. If he’s still interested.
    I think someone writing for the Guardian was commenting about the accelerating speed of Australian political cycles the other, maybe Paola Totaro.
    At Online opinion”, Prof. Carol Johnson presented a short paper on Rudd as to temperament, a little harsh in parts, but on the whole a good thumbnail.
    After what happened to Rudd, you can see why Gillard is reluctant to give up her flat toosoon, lest she lose her humanity.

  13. John D

    The media, the miners, the faction leaders and pollsters are all trying to take credit for Rudd’s overthrow because it increases the perception that they have real power. To my mind the most important factor was actually MP’s coming back to parliament all saying that the Labor brand was suffering and that Rudd was being quoted as the problem. Add this to the the number of MP’s that were already pissed off with the way Rudd was treating and the perception that they either had to dump Rudd now or stick with him to the election and it is hardly surprising that Rudd was dumped and dumped very quickly.

    It is just too easy to give the media too much credit for the Rudd fall.

  14. John D

    The media, the miners, the faction leaders and pollsters are all trying to take credit for Rudd’s overthrow because it increases the perception that they have real power. To my mind the most important factor was actually MP’s coming back to parliament all saying that the Labor brand was suffering and that Rudd was being quoted as the problem. Add this to the the number of MP’s that were already pissed off with the way Rudd was treating and the perception that they either had to dump Rudd now or stick with him to the election and it is hardly surprising that Rudd was dumped and dumped very quickly.

    It is just too easy to give the media too much credit for the Rudd fall.

  15. p.a.travers

    Denmore nails it, this time by his experience.Methinks, that Rudd started to fail mentally , by the inability to not be convoluting in logic,seemingly having a game mindset where repeated statements no longer were seen as an intelligent mind being so.It is a risk , the individual takes,when being on message and on the job by using that message as evidence reduces the impact.Sadly,I also feel he trapped himself,by pathway politics.The middle one often is a deep stretch and with the roller skates of media,double lined undies are necessary because flying by the seat of your pants isn’t the outcome.Backside hardened Abbott now doing the splits needs a lucky charm.But will he wear it round his neck!?

  16. p.a.travers

    Denmore nails it, this time by his experience.Methinks, that Rudd started to fail mentally , by the inability to not be convoluting in logic,seemingly having a game mindset where repeated statements no longer were seen as an intelligent mind being so.It is a risk , the individual takes,when being on message and on the job by using that message as evidence reduces the impact.Sadly,I also feel he trapped himself,by pathway politics.The middle one often is a deep stretch and with the roller skates of media,double lined undies are necessary because flying by the seat of your pants isn’t the outcome.Backside hardened Abbott now doing the splits needs a lucky charm.But will he wear it round his neck!?

  17. pablo

    Some acknowledgement of the Parliamentary timetable in the fall of Rudd ought be mentioned. With it due to rise for a six week break from Thursday June 22 you could probably predict a climactic event within that time. I’m not suggesting it as a cause but perhaps another justification for action once ‘the action’ had been determined by Wednesday eve.
    Also this blog was on the money with predicting the Rudd eclipse. Certainly Fran Barlow was one who took the plunge in the Saturday salon the previous weekend. I know because I chided her on it being a ‘big call’. Sure a prediction is different from actual reportage. There were a few prescient bloggers as I recall. Good one Fran.

  18. pablo

    Some acknowledgement of the Parliamentary timetable in the fall of Rudd ought be mentioned. With it due to rise for a six week break from Thursday June 22 you could probably predict a climactic event within that time. I’m not suggesting it as a cause but perhaps another justification for action once ‘the action’ had been determined by Wednesday eve.
    Also this blog was on the money with predicting the Rudd eclipse. Certainly Fran Barlow was one who took the plunge in the Saturday salon the previous weekend. I know because I chided her on it being a ‘big call’. Sure a prediction is different from actual reportage. There were a few prescient bloggers as I recall. Good one Fran.

  19. Russell

    That Matthew Ricketson piece is so badly written it made me laugh out loud – is it a spoof on bad journalism?

    I agree with Katz – the media can be a factor, but we can’t say how much. Ricketson of course can say how much, eg. “it was not the ALP but he and his avatar ‘Kevin 07’ that most Australians thought they were voting for at the 2007 election …”. So are LP readers part of the ‘most Australians’ who weren’t voting for the ALP but the Kevin 07 avatar? Give me strength ….

    Someone asked on the other thread how many people read The Australian. Of those, how many are swinging voters? Of those, how many can’t detect bias?

    And as has also been bemoaned, how many people know or care? My guess is that less than 20% of the population could name their state and federal MPs. Yes the media create a backdrop, they dismiss/withold viewpoints, they can’t deal with complexity (knowing their audience?), they dramatise and trivialise, but who’s really paying attention? It seems to me people take much more notice of the opinions of certain of their friends, colleagues – people who seem to be well informed and balanced.

  20. Russell

    That Matthew Ricketson piece is so badly written it made me laugh out loud – is it a spoof on bad journalism?

    I agree with Katz – the media can be a factor, but we can’t say how much. Ricketson of course can say how much, eg. “it was not the ALP but he and his avatar ‘Kevin 07’ that most Australians thought they were voting for at the 2007 election …”. So are LP readers part of the ‘most Australians’ who weren’t voting for the ALP but the Kevin 07 avatar? Give me strength ….

    Someone asked on the other thread how many people read The Australian. Of those, how many are swinging voters? Of those, how many can’t detect bias?

    And as has also been bemoaned, how many people know or care? My guess is that less than 20% of the population could name their state and federal MPs. Yes the media create a backdrop, they dismiss/withold viewpoints, they can’t deal with complexity (knowing their audience?), they dramatise and trivialise, but who’s really paying attention? It seems to me people take much more notice of the opinions of certain of their friends, colleagues – people who seem to be well informed and balanced.

  21. Rebekka

    @Mr Denmore, well said.

    @Pablo, we predicted the spill a month ago at lolpolz.

  22. Rebekka

    @Mr Denmore, well said.

    @Pablo, we predicted the spill a month ago at lolpolz.

  23. Patrickb

    @2
    The Australian has been running a vigorous denialist line for some time. Admittedly this probably is a direct cause but it certainly had some impact on the public debate. Remember the coverage given to Monckton? Public support for action on climate change fell away sharply and as Ricketson says, politicians have become very sensitive to polls of a range of subjects.

  24. Patrickb

    @2
    The Australian has been running a vigorous denialist line for some time. Admittedly this probably is a direct cause but it certainly had some impact on the public debate. Remember the coverage given to Monckton? Public support for action on climate change fell away sharply and as Ricketson says, politicians have become very sensitive to polls of a range of subjects.

  25. pablo

    Fair call Rebekka, I missed it.

  26. pablo

    Fair call Rebekka, I missed it.

  27. Patrickb

    @9
    “but who’s really paying attention?”
    Actually I think that’s the point. Not many people are paying close attention. So by creating an atmosphere of crisis with a few catchy slogans thrown in, viola, spectacular event precipitated, job done for now. Very tasty, who’s the next course?

    Of course if more people paid as much attention as people do here it would be much harder to create a tipping point, but then if more people paid as much attention as people do here not much else would get done …

  28. Patrickb

    @9
    “but who’s really paying attention?”
    Actually I think that’s the point. Not many people are paying close attention. So by creating an atmosphere of crisis with a few catchy slogans thrown in, viola, spectacular event precipitated, job done for now. Very tasty, who’s the next course?

    Of course if more people paid as much attention as people do here it would be much harder to create a tipping point, but then if more people paid as much attention as people do here not much else would get done …

  29. ossie

    Rebekka

    I predicted it the night of the election victory. And the people I bet against have actually paid up!

  30. ossie

    Rebekka

    I predicted it the night of the election victory. And the people I bet against have actually paid up!

  31. ossie

    Mr Denmore

    I do not see any direct link between a list of newspaper quotes and the toppling of a PM. Surely, there is an excluded middle?

  32. ossie

    Mr Denmore

    I do not see any direct link between a list of newspaper quotes and the toppling of a PM. Surely, there is an excluded middle?

  33. Ron

    John D

    “The media, the miners, the faction leaders and pollsters are all trying to take credit for Rudd’s overthrow because it increases the perception that they have real power.

    To my mind the MOST important factor was actually MP’s coming back to parliament all saying that the Labor brand was suffering and that Rudd was being quoted as the problem.”

    quite so , and confirmed to those 115 Caucus MPs by Polls all showed with a NEGATIVE approval rating (don 60% in 8 months) therefore dagging down Labors vote (and to 51.4% TPP average of th 4 polls in last week , and Primary at terrible av of 35.6%)

    but others look for false conspiracy theories when obvous is there

  34. Ron

    John D

    “The media, the miners, the faction leaders and pollsters are all trying to take credit for Rudd’s overthrow because it increases the perception that they have real power.

    To my mind the MOST important factor was actually MP’s coming back to parliament all saying that the Labor brand was suffering and that Rudd was being quoted as the problem.”

    quite so , and confirmed to those 115 Caucus MPs by Polls all showed with a NEGATIVE approval rating (don 60% in 8 months) therefore dagging down Labors vote (and to 51.4% TPP average of th 4 polls in last week , and Primary at terrible av of 35.6%)

    but others look for false conspiracy theories when obvous is there

  35. tssk

    While part of me would like to think it was all a grand Murdoch conspiracy against Rudd the truth is that we’ve created these complicated structures that have taken on a life of their own. It’s a bit like how corporations are legally bound now to exploit people as much as possible rather than to serve people. These structures left unchecked are now running us instead of us running them.

  36. tssk

    While part of me would like to think it was all a grand Murdoch conspiracy against Rudd the truth is that we’ve created these complicated structures that have taken on a life of their own. It’s a bit like how corporations are legally bound now to exploit people as much as possible rather than to serve people. These structures left unchecked are now running us instead of us running them.

  37. Thomas Paine

    Nor did the media create Rudd’s lack of interest in building relationships with his own colleagues.

    That was all his own work.

    But evidently they built that belief in your thinking. Where else did you get it not from media? Labor insiders, of the kind that wanted to character assassinate?

    Well if party insiders are going to start tweeting from every meeting the better answer to ensure totally transparency and fairness in Leadership transfers. And by this set be law a standard procedure that must be followed and followed openly.

    Since these are elected by the people there should be no closed doors in leadership discussions and voting. Exposure to the public may well modify habits and tactics and ensure a less corrupt process than we saw with the miners buying a PM.

    Otherwise the next media will be embedded video and microphones in everybody’s head.

  38. Thomas Paine

    Nor did the media create Rudd’s lack of interest in building relationships with his own colleagues.

    That was all his own work.

    But evidently they built that belief in your thinking. Where else did you get it not from media? Labor insiders, of the kind that wanted to character assassinate?

    Well if party insiders are going to start tweeting from every meeting the better answer to ensure totally transparency and fairness in Leadership transfers. And by this set be law a standard procedure that must be followed and followed openly.

    Since these are elected by the people there should be no closed doors in leadership discussions and voting. Exposure to the public may well modify habits and tactics and ensure a less corrupt process than we saw with the miners buying a PM.

    Otherwise the next media will be embedded video and microphones in everybody’s head.

  39. Mr Denmore

    Mr Denmore

    I do not see any direct link between a list of newspaper quotes and the toppling of a PM. Surely, there is an excluded middle?

    Ossie, I’m not one of those claiming a media conspiracy. I am saying that second-by-second breathless reporting (without context or background), incessant chatter and twittering, the reflexive analysis of almost constant opinion polling and the belief among the media that being first in reporting a news event that was going to break anyway within hours – if not minutes – has created a climate that encourages poor decision making.

    And I’m not saying Rudd was a helpless victim of all this. Poorly advised by young minders (some of them former journos), he found himself tap dancing to the cacophonous tune played by the press gallery.

    At a wider level, I think the hype surrounding the role of social and “always on” media in Obama’s election victory went to a few people’s heads and polluted their news judgement. The mainstream media is responding to the Twitter and Facebook phenomena by aping it, in the process throwing out the virtues of good journalism – detachment, perspective, context, understanding.

    As we are now, the noise to signal ratio is sky high. Everyone is running around like chooks with their heads cut off responding to thousands of little storms in thousands of little teacups and not grasping the real challenges.

    And those are pretty obvious – a potentially catatrosphic transformation in our global climate and the self-destruction of capitalism by the creation of giant ponzi schemes.

  40. Mr Denmore

    Mr Denmore

    I do not see any direct link between a list of newspaper quotes and the toppling of a PM. Surely, there is an excluded middle?

    Ossie, I’m not one of those claiming a media conspiracy. I am saying that second-by-second breathless reporting (without context or background), incessant chatter and twittering, the reflexive analysis of almost constant opinion polling and the belief among the media that being first in reporting a news event that was going to break anyway within hours – if not minutes – has created a climate that encourages poor decision making.

    And I’m not saying Rudd was a helpless victim of all this. Poorly advised by young minders (some of them former journos), he found himself tap dancing to the cacophonous tune played by the press gallery.

    At a wider level, I think the hype surrounding the role of social and “always on” media in Obama’s election victory went to a few people’s heads and polluted their news judgement. The mainstream media is responding to the Twitter and Facebook phenomena by aping it, in the process throwing out the virtues of good journalism – detachment, perspective, context, understanding.

    As we are now, the noise to signal ratio is sky high. Everyone is running around like chooks with their heads cut off responding to thousands of little storms in thousands of little teacups and not grasping the real challenges.

    And those are pretty obvious – a potentially catatrosphic transformation in our global climate and the self-destruction of capitalism by the creation of giant ponzi schemes.

  41. pablo

    PatricB @14 asks “who’s the next course?” for media assassination (my inference). Maybe entirely off topic but John Howard’s attempt to be the No2 head honcho of world cricket is shaping up nicely. He refuses to back down after being rejected, putting his Aussi/NZ backers (re: party) in an awkward position – they have a ‘reserve’ candidate who is more acceptable to the refusniks who have given no reason for denying Howard. Some Rudd backers would see shades of that in Gillard claims of “getting off track”.
    Before I get further off thread I’ll stop but couldn’t resist the chance PatricB

  42. pablo

    PatricB @14 asks “who’s the next course?” for media assassination (my inference). Maybe entirely off topic but John Howard’s attempt to be the No2 head honcho of world cricket is shaping up nicely. He refuses to back down after being rejected, putting his Aussi/NZ backers (re: party) in an awkward position – they have a ‘reserve’ candidate who is more acceptable to the refusniks who have given no reason for denying Howard. Some Rudd backers would see shades of that in Gillard claims of “getting off track”.
    Before I get further off thread I’ll stop but couldn’t resist the chance PatricB

  43. Don Wigan

    Ossie @16

    I haven’t got the link, but I think Bob Ellis at the Drum might have gone close to what you were asking.

    The gruelling schedule for the PM almost guarantees that he cannot be at his best 24/7, while media demand seemingly requires him to be. I think there were other issues at play, which Ellis also touches on, such as an inability to delegate to a very talented team.

    These are not the only factors at work, but when they are combined with a lot of increasingly nervous MPs, we need not draw the conclusion that it was a conspiracy hatched by faction bosses, mining bosses and News Ltd. They were a part but only a peripheral part at that.

    If Gillard makes it, her more inclusive approach might help, but her chief of staff or media liaison person ought to put a system in place to rotate various ministers through the spotlight to lessen that central demand.

  44. Don Wigan

    Ossie @16

    I haven’t got the link, but I think Bob Ellis at the Drum might have gone close to what you were asking.

    The gruelling schedule for the PM almost guarantees that he cannot be at his best 24/7, while media demand seemingly requires him to be. I think there were other issues at play, which Ellis also touches on, such as an inability to delegate to a very talented team.

    These are not the only factors at work, but when they are combined with a lot of increasingly nervous MPs, we need not draw the conclusion that it was a conspiracy hatched by faction bosses, mining bosses and News Ltd. They were a part but only a peripheral part at that.

    If Gillard makes it, her more inclusive approach might help, but her chief of staff or media liaison person ought to put a system in place to rotate various ministers through the spotlight to lessen that central demand.

  45. Mr Denmore

    Yes, Don, more astute media management (hopefully involving older heads) is called for.

    If it were advising Gillard, I’d tell her to pull back on the trend that began under Howard and continued under Rudd of the PM providing a sort of running commentary on news, irrespective of its relevance to politics.

    This is the PM as state premier approach, in which the government’s need for exposure and the media’s need for a constant stream of copy leads the prime minister to comment on such issues as children’s TV watching, art controversies like the Henson exhibition and round-the-world sailors.

    Governing the nation is hard enough as it is without having to provide instant punditry on every topic the media is obsessing about on that particular day.

    I would also recommend winding back the trend towards politics as a reality TV show, with parliament cast as the Big Brother house. We need to go back to a respectful distance between politicians and the public.

  46. Mr Denmore

    Yes, Don, more astute media management (hopefully involving older heads) is called for.

    If it were advising Gillard, I’d tell her to pull back on the trend that began under Howard and continued under Rudd of the PM providing a sort of running commentary on news, irrespective of its relevance to politics.

    This is the PM as state premier approach, in which the government’s need for exposure and the media’s need for a constant stream of copy leads the prime minister to comment on such issues as children’s TV watching, art controversies like the Henson exhibition and round-the-world sailors.

    Governing the nation is hard enough as it is without having to provide instant punditry on every topic the media is obsessing about on that particular day.

    I would also recommend winding back the trend towards politics as a reality TV show, with parliament cast as the Big Brother house. We need to go back to a respectful distance between politicians and the public.

  47. Thomas Paine

    There is of course the most obvious outcome of a 24/7 news cycle and instant reporting of bits and pieces on twitter, SMS and so forth – it turns the Prime Minister of the country into Prime Minster for the Labor (Liberal) party. The PM is involved in a constant running battle to maintain the image of his party. 24/7 news cycle and technology just magnify’s this.

    Has anybody understood this in the context of what Gillard is now doing in negotiating with the miners? For what purpose, to what end. We have all be suckered into a new thinking.

    Gillard is negotiating with miners so they will stop there advertising (she said as much in her acceptance speech remember – stop you advertising because we will negotiate).

    This is a political end not one to do with the managing of the country. So Gillard will negotiate away Australian revenue so the miners will stop election damaging advertising. How corrupt can the office of the PM and Govt become when they do that, and we all cheer when they are successful at it.

  48. Thomas Paine

    There is of course the most obvious outcome of a 24/7 news cycle and instant reporting of bits and pieces on twitter, SMS and so forth – it turns the Prime Minister of the country into Prime Minster for the Labor (Liberal) party. The PM is involved in a constant running battle to maintain the image of his party. 24/7 news cycle and technology just magnify’s this.

    Has anybody understood this in the context of what Gillard is now doing in negotiating with the miners? For what purpose, to what end. We have all be suckered into a new thinking.

    Gillard is negotiating with miners so they will stop there advertising (she said as much in her acceptance speech remember – stop you advertising because we will negotiate).

    This is a political end not one to do with the managing of the country. So Gillard will negotiate away Australian revenue so the miners will stop election damaging advertising. How corrupt can the office of the PM and Govt become when they do that, and we all cheer when they are successful at it.

  49. patrickb

    Whoops, a bit late but my @12 should have said “isn’t a direct cause”.

  50. patrickb

    Whoops, a bit late but my @12 should have said “isn’t a direct cause”.

  51. adrian

    Thomas Paine, it’s amusing when people claim that the media has minimal effect on people’s perceptions and therefore little if any effect on the downfall of Rudd, but then buy without question the characterisations of Rudd that have been incessently promoted by the media. Where do these people get their opinions from? With some exceptions, from the media.

    One great side effect of all this though is that I no longer care about politics in this country very much. I hope the Greens get the balance of power in the Senate, but other than that who cares?
    There are far better things to do with your time than worry about the latest poll, the consequences of this that or the other, or the pathetic excuse for the media that we have in this country. It’s quite liberating actually.

  52. adrian

    Thomas Paine, it’s amusing when people claim that the media has minimal effect on people’s perceptions and therefore little if any effect on the downfall of Rudd, but then buy without question the characterisations of Rudd that have been incessently promoted by the media. Where do these people get their opinions from? With some exceptions, from the media.

    One great side effect of all this though is that I no longer care about politics in this country very much. I hope the Greens get the balance of power in the Senate, but other than that who cares?
    There are far better things to do with your time than worry about the latest poll, the consequences of this that or the other, or the pathetic excuse for the media that we have in this country. It’s quite liberating actually.

  53. Paul Burns

    Thomas Paine @ 24,
    Surely you mean how corrupt can the big mining companies get that they dare to blackmail an elected government?

  54. Paul Burns

    Thomas Paine @ 24,
    Surely you mean how corrupt can the big mining companies get that they dare to blackmail an elected government?

  55. Thomas Paine

    Indeed that too.

    It is disturbing. And it is as though the Govt and PM don’t realise what this is about and take it for granted it is ok to negotiate as a govt for what is only benefit for their party.

    The cost we know now is about $2bn per annum. This is the cost to Autralians of getting the mining industry to in effec stop hurting the electoral prospects of the Labor Party.

    It is also what it costs to replace a PM which the mining industry has done one way or another.

  56. Thomas Paine

    Indeed that too.

    It is disturbing. And it is as though the Govt and PM don’t realise what this is about and take it for granted it is ok to negotiate as a govt for what is only benefit for their party.

    The cost we know now is about $2bn per annum. This is the cost to Autralians of getting the mining industry to in effec stop hurting the electoral prospects of the Labor Party.

    It is also what it costs to replace a PM which the mining industry has done one way or another.

  57. Katz

    it’s amusing when people claim that the media has minimal effect on people’s perceptions and therefore little if any effect on the downfall of Rudd, but then buy without question the characterisations of Rudd that have been incessently promoted by the media. Where do these people get their opinions from? With some exceptions, from the media.

    Shorter Adrian: everyone who disagrees with me is a brainwashed zombie.

    The people who pulled the plug on Rudd (the Caucus, whom Rudd was frenetically monitoring the night of the coup) read the media. They also consult with advisers and they talk to constituents. Most of them are anything but brainwashed zombies.

    Of course the media are players in this game. The question is whether they are fifth, sixth or seventh most important element in the fate of any political leader, including Rudd.

    Ricketson’s most interesting observation was how political operators used the media. Interestingly, he concluded that the MSM continues to be the most efficient means of pumping a message.

  58. Katz

    it’s amusing when people claim that the media has minimal effect on people’s perceptions and therefore little if any effect on the downfall of Rudd, but then buy without question the characterisations of Rudd that have been incessently promoted by the media. Where do these people get their opinions from? With some exceptions, from the media.

    Shorter Adrian: everyone who disagrees with me is a brainwashed zombie.

    The people who pulled the plug on Rudd (the Caucus, whom Rudd was frenetically monitoring the night of the coup) read the media. They also consult with advisers and they talk to constituents. Most of them are anything but brainwashed zombies.

    Of course the media are players in this game. The question is whether they are fifth, sixth or seventh most important element in the fate of any political leader, including Rudd.

    Ricketson’s most interesting observation was how political operators used the media. Interestingly, he concluded that the MSM continues to be the most efficient means of pumping a message.

  59. Nick

    “The question is whether they are fifth, sixth or seventh most important element”

    The question is whether they were a decisive element or not. Whether the spill simply wouldn’t have occurred without their alleged influence and its employment.

    Difficult without first wading through and determining the influence of the poll results themselves versus that of a poll-result driven media, and flipsidedly by how much the poll results were allegedly media-driven.

    Or, more conveniently, some “we knew we couldn’t pull it off unless we leaked it right then…and specifically to the ABC” statements from horses’ mouths.

    An explanation of the latter would be a shortcut route to also establishing the former – and, agreed, that was his most interesting observation.

  60. Nick

    “The question is whether they are fifth, sixth or seventh most important element”

    The question is whether they were a decisive element or not. Whether the spill simply wouldn’t have occurred without their alleged influence and its employment.

    Difficult without first wading through and determining the influence of the poll results themselves versus that of a poll-result driven media, and flipsidedly by how much the poll results were allegedly media-driven.

    Or, more conveniently, some “we knew we couldn’t pull it off unless we leaked it right then…and specifically to the ABC” statements from horses’ mouths.

    An explanation of the latter would be a shortcut route to also establishing the former – and, agreed, that was his most interesting observation.

  61. Katz

    To be more precise the question is whether the media were, well, “media”. The strictest meaning of that word is as simply a conduit by which others communicated. That very narrow sense is that the media were simply like telephone lines that added not colour at all to the coverage of the struggle over Rudd.

    I want it to be clear that I do not believe that interpretation to be the case.

    Clearly, the media were a player in this. News Limited, for example, have long slanted their news coverage and editorialising against Labor in general and against Rudd in particular. This is the headwind that the ALP and its leaders must always cope with.

    Because the nature of this coverage and interference did not change from well established patterns in the run up to the removal of Rudd, I believe that it is a stretch to call the influence of the media to be “decisive”. Again, this is not the same as saying that the media had some measurable influence.

  62. Katz

    To be more precise the question is whether the media were, well, “media”. The strictest meaning of that word is as simply a conduit by which others communicated. That very narrow sense is that the media were simply like telephone lines that added not colour at all to the coverage of the struggle over Rudd.

    I want it to be clear that I do not believe that interpretation to be the case.

    Clearly, the media were a player in this. News Limited, for example, have long slanted their news coverage and editorialising against Labor in general and against Rudd in particular. This is the headwind that the ALP and its leaders must always cope with.

    Because the nature of this coverage and interference did not change from well established patterns in the run up to the removal of Rudd, I believe that it is a stretch to call the influence of the media to be “decisive”. Again, this is not the same as saying that the media had some measurable influence.

  63. Nick

    “Because the nature of this coverage and interference did not change from well established patterns in the run up to the removal of Rudd, I believe that it is a stretch to call the influence of the media to be “decisive”.”

    I’m not convinced b. follows from a. Arguably, media coverage and interference deviated from established patterns the moment unnamed ALP sources began to infect it (and therefore their own party’s PR) as part of their spill strategy.

    But, that aside, the question remains why did they feel they had to? If the answer were we couldn’t otherwise influence a successful spill outcome – and they were correct – that equals ‘decisive’, regardless of any factors that might be considered ‘of more importance’.

  64. Nick

    “Because the nature of this coverage and interference did not change from well established patterns in the run up to the removal of Rudd, I believe that it is a stretch to call the influence of the media to be “decisive”.”

    I’m not convinced b. follows from a. Arguably, media coverage and interference deviated from established patterns the moment unnamed ALP sources began to infect it (and therefore their own party’s PR) as part of their spill strategy.

    But, that aside, the question remains why did they feel they had to? If the answer were we couldn’t otherwise influence a successful spill outcome – and they were correct – that equals ‘decisive’, regardless of any factors that might be considered ‘of more importance’.

  65. Katz

    Arguably, media coverage and interference deviated from established patterns the moment unnamed ALP sources began to infect it (and therefore their own party’s PR) as part of their spill strategy.

    Certainly, the media may have changed its behaviour when “sources” began to attempt to manipulate the flow of information. One would be extremely surprised if there were not a dialectical relationship between the providers of information and the gatekeepers to media outlets. But by that formulation, the decisive factor was the “sources”.

    The alternative would be that the media made up crucial elements of the “sources'” leaks. I don’t think that such an accusation has ever been made.

    But, that aside, the question remains why did they feel they had to?

    Who is the “they” in this sentence?

    If it is the media, the answer is that they were doing their job. Whenever heavy hitters start plotting against each other and that plotting occasions leaks, then that is certainly newsworthy. It’s a bit harsh to blame someone for doing their job. It is hardly “decisive” when people behaved as they would always behave. It might have been decisive if all media outlets had taken a vow of silence on the turmoil in the ALP. But such behaviour would have to count as not only decisive but also bizarre. Alternatively, the journalists could have shot and killed the “sources”, thus “decisively” ending the plot. But such behaviour is also even more bizarre in a journalist.

    If is is the “sources”, the answer is that is how politics is played out in a media-rich world.

  66. Katz

    Arguably, media coverage and interference deviated from established patterns the moment unnamed ALP sources began to infect it (and therefore their own party’s PR) as part of their spill strategy.

    Certainly, the media may have changed its behaviour when “sources” began to attempt to manipulate the flow of information. One would be extremely surprised if there were not a dialectical relationship between the providers of information and the gatekeepers to media outlets. But by that formulation, the decisive factor was the “sources”.

    The alternative would be that the media made up crucial elements of the “sources'” leaks. I don’t think that such an accusation has ever been made.

    But, that aside, the question remains why did they feel they had to?

    Who is the “they” in this sentence?

    If it is the media, the answer is that they were doing their job. Whenever heavy hitters start plotting against each other and that plotting occasions leaks, then that is certainly newsworthy. It’s a bit harsh to blame someone for doing their job. It is hardly “decisive” when people behaved as they would always behave. It might have been decisive if all media outlets had taken a vow of silence on the turmoil in the ALP. But such behaviour would have to count as not only decisive but also bizarre. Alternatively, the journalists could have shot and killed the “sources”, thus “decisively” ending the plot. But such behaviour is also even more bizarre in a journalist.

    If is is the “sources”, the answer is that is how politics is played out in a media-rich world.

  67. Nick

    So a necessary component of the strategy, and in an increasingly media-rich world, internal party politics will be increasingly staged through the media. But that’s a trite conclusion, which says it is as it always was – and so it is. So yes, in that sense ‘decisive’ is a stretch.

    But, it’s easy enough to screw up and run aground through the media too. Ricketson put forward as an example correct choice of media outlet and it’s perceived accompanying bias (or lack thereof).

    So what if media outlets weren’t perceived as biased to begin with. Could they (the sources) have still engineered a successful spill, and so quickly, in a more balanced media landscape, or did they require a slanted media (in contrast) to generate the necessary downhill momentum? If not…

  68. Nick

    So a necessary component of the strategy, and in an increasingly media-rich world, internal party politics will be increasingly staged through the media. But that’s a trite conclusion, which says it is as it always was – and so it is. So yes, in that sense ‘decisive’ is a stretch.

    But, it’s easy enough to screw up and run aground through the media too. Ricketson put forward as an example correct choice of media outlet and it’s perceived accompanying bias (or lack thereof).

    So what if media outlets weren’t perceived as biased to begin with. Could they (the sources) have still engineered a successful spill, and so quickly, in a more balanced media landscape, or did they require a slanted media (in contrast) to generate the necessary downhill momentum? If not…

  69. Kim

    Elsewhere: Tim Dunlop and Waleed Aly at The Drum.

  70. Kim

    Elsewhere: Tim Dunlop and Waleed Aly at The Drum.

  71. Katz

    So what if media outlets weren’t perceived as biased to begin with. Could they (the sources) have still engineered a successful spill, and so quickly, in a more balanced media landscape, or did they require a slanted media (in contrast) to generate the necessary downhill momentum?

    Interesting counterfactual.

    How would a “more balanced” or even left wing media outlet handle such leaks? The desire to have a scoop is most likely to trump any other desire.

    And in any case a “balanced” media landscape would include right wing media outlets. Once one media outlet decided to run with the story all outlets would be compelled to at least acknowledge the leak.

  72. Katz

    So what if media outlets weren’t perceived as biased to begin with. Could they (the sources) have still engineered a successful spill, and so quickly, in a more balanced media landscape, or did they require a slanted media (in contrast) to generate the necessary downhill momentum?

    Interesting counterfactual.

    How would a “more balanced” or even left wing media outlet handle such leaks? The desire to have a scoop is most likely to trump any other desire.

    And in any case a “balanced” media landscape would include right wing media outlets. Once one media outlet decided to run with the story all outlets would be compelled to at least acknowledge the leak.

  73. ossie

    Another inexplicable assumption of the dominant narrative here (it was the media!) is the direction of this alleged media bias. Let’s assume I agree with the most fervent “it was the evil media” advocates. There remain at least a few issues:

    1. Perhaps this “bias” was/is correct.

    Folks tend to just presume that media bias precedes – thus influencing/causing individual, social, and political action and context. Can it ever be the other way around?

    One of my earliest media bias encounters was a teacher showig us an edition of The Bulletin. The front-page plastered with John Howard’s mug. In huge letters it said

    Mr 18% Why Does This Man Even Bother!

    As teenagers boy, we laughed for years. Sadly, a number of pupils at my school spent months of their high school years as Mr/Miss 18%. I still think John Howard caused that bias, not the media. Anyone here disagree and denounce the Bulletin?

    OTOH, in no way am I some media Pollyanna. My very first memory of the evil potential of the media was Lindy Chamberlain’s conviction. But when it gets to the big game, their relationship with the media is more symbiotic.

    2. The other unexamined assumption that intrigues me is why anyone thinks they a right to expect – let alone demand – non-government media to be “unbiased.”

    Wouldn’t you love to own a newspaper or TV network and publish daily “Australia’s Biggest Dickest – the Unbiased View!” 🙂

    3. Relating to this blog in particular. A lot of anger at the media seems to be based on not very well-informed understanding of what happens in the media production process.

    I have a close mate, very involved in left-wing stuff at a reasonably high end, who never stops about Murdoch. On issue, I asked him what Murdoch would get out of this particular issue.

    His reply” “He’s a bloody Tory mate. It’s to make his fellow ruling class allies richer by pushing down the workers.”

    I was too scared to ask what he could possibly mean, in case he answered.

  74. ossie

    Another inexplicable assumption of the dominant narrative here (it was the media!) is the direction of this alleged media bias. Let’s assume I agree with the most fervent “it was the evil media” advocates. There remain at least a few issues:

    1. Perhaps this “bias” was/is correct.

    Folks tend to just presume that media bias precedes – thus influencing/causing individual, social, and political action and context. Can it ever be the other way around?

    One of my earliest media bias encounters was a teacher showig us an edition of The Bulletin. The front-page plastered with John Howard’s mug. In huge letters it said

    Mr 18% Why Does This Man Even Bother!

    As teenagers boy, we laughed for years. Sadly, a number of pupils at my school spent months of their high school years as Mr/Miss 18%. I still think John Howard caused that bias, not the media. Anyone here disagree and denounce the Bulletin?

    OTOH, in no way am I some media Pollyanna. My very first memory of the evil potential of the media was Lindy Chamberlain’s conviction. But when it gets to the big game, their relationship with the media is more symbiotic.

    2. The other unexamined assumption that intrigues me is why anyone thinks they a right to expect – let alone demand – non-government media to be “unbiased.”

    Wouldn’t you love to own a newspaper or TV network and publish daily “Australia’s Biggest Dickest – the Unbiased View!” 🙂

    3. Relating to this blog in particular. A lot of anger at the media seems to be based on not very well-informed understanding of what happens in the media production process.

    I have a close mate, very involved in left-wing stuff at a reasonably high end, who never stops about Murdoch. On issue, I asked him what Murdoch would get out of this particular issue.

    His reply” “He’s a bloody Tory mate. It’s to make his fellow ruling class allies richer by pushing down the workers.”

    I was too scared to ask what he could possibly mean, in case he answered.

  75. Kim

    Elsewhere: Guy Rundle.

  76. Kim

    Elsewhere: Guy Rundle.

  77. Katz

    So a necessary component of the strategy, and in an increasingly media-rich world, internal party politics will be increasingly staged through the media. But that’s a trite conclusion, which says it is as it always was – and so it is.

    This passage contains an internal contradiction.

    If something is “increasingly” doing this or “increasingly” doing that, then by definition it cannot be said to be that “it is as it always was”.

    One half of the statement contains a universal. The other half of the statement asserts change over time.

    My understanding of the relationship between “sources” and the media is of a relationship that has evolved over time and therefore neither ahistorical nor trite.

  78. Katz

    So a necessary component of the strategy, and in an increasingly media-rich world, internal party politics will be increasingly staged through the media. But that’s a trite conclusion, which says it is as it always was – and so it is.

    This passage contains an internal contradiction.

    If something is “increasingly” doing this or “increasingly” doing that, then by definition it cannot be said to be that “it is as it always was”.

    One half of the statement contains a universal. The other half of the statement asserts change over time.

    My understanding of the relationship between “sources” and the media is of a relationship that has evolved over time and therefore neither ahistorical nor trite.

  79. Nick

    If something is “increasingly” doing this or “increasingly” doing that, then by definition it cannot be said to be that “it is as it always was”.

    Of course it can:

    “something is increasingly doing this”

    “something always was increasingly doing that”.

    “My understanding of the relationship between “sources” and the media is of a relationship that has evolved over time and therefore neither ahistorical nor trite.”

    “that is how politics is played out in a media-rich world.”

  80. Nick

    If something is “increasingly” doing this or “increasingly” doing that, then by definition it cannot be said to be that “it is as it always was”.

    Of course it can:

    “something is increasingly doing this”

    “something always was increasingly doing that”.

    “My understanding of the relationship between “sources” and the media is of a relationship that has evolved over time and therefore neither ahistorical nor trite.”

    “that is how politics is played out in a media-rich world.”

  81. Nick

    Oops, forgot:

    “One half of the statement contains a universal. The other half of the statement asserts change over time.”

    If you’re not familiar with the concept of universal change over time, Katz, I really can’t help you out of this one.

  82. Nick

    Oops, forgot:

    “One half of the statement contains a universal. The other half of the statement asserts change over time.”

    If you’re not familiar with the concept of universal change over time, Katz, I really can’t help you out of this one.

  83. Katz

    I really can’t help you out of this one.

    “Can’t”? Or “won’t”?

  84. Katz

    I really can’t help you out of this one.

    “Can’t”? Or “won’t”?

  85. Nick

    Can’t!

    😉 I hope that came across as good humoured.

    I find it to be an interesting counterfactual too. That said, I haven’t got very far with it – it needs an Overton-like overlay thingy to express itself properly. But for its purposes, a more balanced media landscape would consist of less (not fewer) biased outlets, not an ‘even’ amount.

    And, yes, the desire to get a scoop would still exist and trump most everything else, since it means the first interviews and photos (ownership of history), more time to chase up secondary leads, interviews and photos to further develop the story (pad with), more time to sub-edit and edit, and generally just more time to produce a more saleable product (frick about with computer graphics) than your competitors before the conclusion of the current media cycle.

    It’s how scoops and leaks, and entire political narratives, might be transmitted and received differently across a less partisan landscape, and for what purposes outlets could or couldn’t be effectively fed by political parties (and other interest groups) for expected outcomes, that I’m interested in.

  86. Nick

    Can’t!

    😉 I hope that came across as good humoured.

    I find it to be an interesting counterfactual too. That said, I haven’t got very far with it – it needs an Overton-like overlay thingy to express itself properly. But for its purposes, a more balanced media landscape would consist of less (not fewer) biased outlets, not an ‘even’ amount.

    And, yes, the desire to get a scoop would still exist and trump most everything else, since it means the first interviews and photos (ownership of history), more time to chase up secondary leads, interviews and photos to further develop the story (pad with), more time to sub-edit and edit, and generally just more time to produce a more saleable product (frick about with computer graphics) than your competitors before the conclusion of the current media cycle.

    It’s how scoops and leaks, and entire political narratives, might be transmitted and received differently across a less partisan landscape, and for what purposes outlets could or couldn’t be effectively fed by political parties (and other interest groups) for expected outcomes, that I’m interested in.

  87. Katz

    Nick, I’ve never doubted your esprit de jeu.

    It’s how scoops and leaks, and entire political narratives, might be transmitted and received differently across a less partisan landscape, and for what purposes outlets could or couldn’t be effectively fed by political parties (and other interest groups) for expected outcomes, that I’m interested in.

    As you acknowledge, this is not how it works. Perhaps, Kevin Rudd could redirect his post-prime ministerial energies and talents into the project of making our media better than it is now.

    Mr Rudd may even now believe that such a project is “the greatest moral challenge of our time.”

  88. Katz

    Nick, I’ve never doubted your esprit de jeu.

    It’s how scoops and leaks, and entire political narratives, might be transmitted and received differently across a less partisan landscape, and for what purposes outlets could or couldn’t be effectively fed by political parties (and other interest groups) for expected outcomes, that I’m interested in.

    As you acknowledge, this is not how it works. Perhaps, Kevin Rudd could redirect his post-prime ministerial energies and talents into the project of making our media better than it is now.

    Mr Rudd may even now believe that such a project is “the greatest moral challenge of our time.”

  89. Arnie P

    Have a listen to Hadley on 2GB if you want to gauge the effect of the media.
    The fools were squawking for 2 days about Rudds dog running away from him.
    Hour after hour and voter after voter

  90. Arnie P

    Have a listen to Hadley on 2GB if you want to gauge the effect of the media.
    The fools were squawking for 2 days about Rudds dog running away from him.
    Hour after hour and voter after voter

  91. Paul Burns

    I’m actually more worried about the cat. It must be totally freaked out. What’s the bet it makes its way back to the Lodge?

  92. Paul Burns

    I’m actually more worried about the cat. It must be totally freaked out. What’s the bet it makes its way back to the Lodge?

  93. KeiThy

    BUT, can the 24 hour news cycle push Australia towards a Solar Powered future?!!?

    Come on Julia, you could reign for eternity if you read this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  94. KeiThy

    BUT, can the 24 hour news cycle push Australia towards a Solar Powered future?!!?

    Come on Julia, you could reign for eternity if you read this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  95. paul walter

    ahhh threads derailing..back to early thirties, please?
    Do you recall the press conference announcing cabinet. Flanking her were those two pragmatic old owls of the prag right, Crean and Steven Smith.
    This is sending good evidence about her core support base and other main players, as was the temporary omission of Rudd, seemingly under the baleful influence of a political injury equivalent to a sports knee reconstruction.
    Could be awhile. Can he come back with something of what many of us have found to like about and vote for, again in the future, particularly if he’s seriously needed?
    In a different frame of mind, perhaps.

  96. paul walter

    ahhh threads derailing..back to early thirties, please?
    Do you recall the press conference announcing cabinet. Flanking her were those two pragmatic old owls of the prag right, Crean and Steven Smith.
    This is sending good evidence about her core support base and other main players, as was the temporary omission of Rudd, seemingly under the baleful influence of a political injury equivalent to a sports knee reconstruction.
    Could be awhile. Can he come back with something of what many of us have found to like about and vote for, again in the future, particularly if he’s seriously needed?
    In a different frame of mind, perhaps.

  97. Katz

    A derail is anything that does not talk about Matthew Ricketson’s thesis about the role of the media in the downfall of Rudd.

  98. Katz

    A derail is anything that does not talk about Matthew Ricketson’s thesis about the role of the media in the downfall of Rudd.

  99. paul walter

    No doubt, Katz. The Gillard press conference and the way it was staged, showed an appreciation of the power of the media seemingly forgotten by Kevin Rudd, something he needed to learn about if he was to complete his education as a politician.
    Paul Burns, if things work out well, The cat will be sitting on Rudd’s lap right now, as both sadly adjust to a new reality.
    But all is not lost.
    A bit of rest and a rethink could have Rudd back in a top job one day and more effective to boot and I couldn’t think of a better wait to start with a reconnect than by way of renewing his acquaintances with his cat; he succeeds here, much more will follow as the lessons are applied.

  100. paul walter

    No doubt, Katz. The Gillard press conference and the way it was staged, showed an appreciation of the power of the media seemingly forgotten by Kevin Rudd, something he needed to learn about if he was to complete his education as a politician.
    Paul Burns, if things work out well, The cat will be sitting on Rudd’s lap right now, as both sadly adjust to a new reality.
    But all is not lost.
    A bit of rest and a rethink could have Rudd back in a top job one day and more effective to boot and I couldn’t think of a better wait to start with a reconnect than by way of renewing his acquaintances with his cat; he succeeds here, much more will follow as the lessons are applied.