« profile & posts archive

This author has written 108 posts for Larvatus Prodeo.

Return to: Homepage | Blog Index

39 responses to “Remember”

  1. dave

    If I was angry with the ALP over their manifestly stupid behaviour, I reserve a special angst for our Tone who feasted ghoul like on the public carcass of trust, grew powerful and now roosts on the top perch. Shame on the lot of them.

  2. James of St James

    Thanks Anna agree with much of what you say, especially the importance of the ALP Opposition taking a principled stand in defending the c price mechanism and related institutions, because it is in the public interest to do so, because it is the right policy, and because the alternative is a sick joke. Those arguing that the party should surrender on c price, are making all the same mistakes that got the party to where it is (unelected due to leadership spills) – thinking of the political tactics of party self interest, instead of making the national interest the priority. It is hard to predict, but this Direct Action policy is so bad, it could end up contributing to early demise of an Abbott Gov’t way quicker than some are willing to imagine right now. It is that bad. And the scope for corruption and money wasted is enormous.
    Would also note, that the photo had a postive connotation for me as it reminded me of the day the c price legislation passed. (But clearly that would was politics nerd’s response not that of the general public.)

  3. silkworm

    Abbott was relying on Sophie Mirabella winningnher seat and installing her as the head of the team that would destroy the dept of climate change, but now it looks like her seat is lost. We must focus a light on Abbott’s plans re climate change. Maybe we can wedge him on his proposed massive tree-planting programme and demand that he make a start on this first before we consider allowing him to destroy our scientific institutions.

  4. Mark Bahnisch

    Remember that there’s no such thing as one final backgrounder to the gallery, one final attempt to hurt the party you claim to support.

    OMG yes!

  5. jules

    It is hard to predict, but this Direct Action policy is so bad, it could end up contributing to early demise of an Abbott Gov’t way quicker than some are willing to imagine right now. It is that bad. And the scope for corruption and money wasted is enormous.

    I totally agree. Its a joke of a policy.

    The ad itself leaves me cold but this doesn’t:

    Remember that the kiss portrayed in this image is a celebration of putting a price on carbon, and that it is worth fighting for. Positively and passionately, not cynically in an attempt to wedge, but in a display of genuine belief that we must take collective, serious action against climate change.

    Yes – you are so right.

  6. Tim Macknay

    It’s perhaps a bit odd, but my reaction to that corflute was that it was mighty stylish for a political advertisement. As you say Anna, it’s a Rorschach test.

    On the topic of fighting for the carbon price, Abbot may be roosting on the top perch, but he’ll be sharing it with unexpected company he accidentally invited. It’s heartening that at least one PUP Senator-to-be has announced she won’t be toeing the party line on the carbon price. It’ll be interesting to see what else comes up. The carbon price ain’t dead yet.

  7. jules

    I think Abbott would lose a DD if a the ALP and Greensput on a well fought campaign that made the DD an actual referendum on what to do about global warming.

    Something along the lines of:

    “This lot makes its money destroying the future of the planet. Tony Abbott wants to give them your money so they can keep doing it. Is this really what you voted for last time?”

  8. James of St James

    “I think Abbott would lose a DD if a the ALP and Greensput on a well fought campaign that made the DD an actual referendum on what to do about global warming.”
    I’d like to agree Jules, perhaps. But even if those that just voted Labour out weren’t willing to let them back in at the time of a DD (if it comes), it is perhaps more feasible that a campaign could be used to convince them to vote Labour/Green majority in the Senate as an insurance on climate change and a way of answering that “referendum” question. (But that scenario would still see a joint sitting of the houses passing the Gov’ts legislation.) For all his bluff and bluster I’m not sure Abbott will risk a DD, (and he may not have to depending on the final Senate make up and subsequent negotiations).

  9. jules

    For all his bluff and bluster I’m not sure Abbott will risk a DD, (and he may not have to depending on the final Senate make up and subsequent negotiations).

    I don’t think he will either. Tho the new senate may make things easy for him.

    I suspect this summer will remind people how bad climate change will get.

  10. jungney

    Helen: “game on Tories”. That’s the spirit!

  11. Ambigulous

    Anna, actually.

  12. Su

    Good to see you posting, Anna. The whole 3rd para is great, so refreshing to see the successes and failures summarised neatly and without apologetics.

  13. jungney

    Yes, thanks, it does. I retire henceforth to bed to await tomorrow’s hangover.

  14. Debbieanne

    Great post Anna. Thanks for putting my current angst into words.

  15. Graham Bell

    What’s wrong with me?
    None, absolutely none, of the LNP’s attack ads and barefaced lies had any effect whatsoever on my voting intentions.
    All in all, they were stupid or ridiculous or sexist or alarmist or else promising something they were manifestly incapable of delivering.

    Wonder how many ALP Members retained their seats BECAUSE OF the LNP’s ads and other propaganda?

  16. Casey

    What’s wrong with me?

    My dear Poet Laureate, you ought not ever ever lead with that question or it may just be answered.

  17. Iain Hall

    I must say that all of the whining about the repeal of the Carbon Tax et al will come to naught because in the end its an issue that the public have well and truly got over and a “solution” that they certainly have no faith in or any belief that our efforts will make the slightest bit of difference at a global level.
    That said I think that the smart money will be on the ALP conceding the point that Abbott has a very clear mandate to repeal the taxes and they will abstain from voting against the bills once they get to the senate. Failing to do this would utterly destroy them at the subsequent DD election and have no doubt Abbott will do that if he is thwarted in the current senate.

  18. paul burns

    As noted by at least one commenter above, let the summer come, and then we’ll see.

  19. jules

    Abbott said he’d be working from “day one” to reduce emissions and stop the so called carbon tax. Its day six and so far nothing. The whole “axe the tax” thing was just more Tony Baloney.

    He’s too gutless to go to a DD.

    The Roast nails it btw.

  20. mindy

    Abbott has a mandate to put his policy to the Senate. The Senate don’t have to agree with him.

  21. John D

    My recollection was that this photo was taken when the carbon tax bill was passed. Hence my reaction when I saw this outside my polling booth was that this was just another bit of LNP sleaze.

  22. Su

    Remember that the kiss portrayed in this image is a celebration of putting a price on carbon, and that it is worth fighting for

    From the post. Poignant.

  23. Katz

    The question is whether there is a more effective scheme to achieve mitigation of Australia’s contribution to AGW.

    The political reality appears to be that voters are unlikely to accept a unilateralist approach. Perhaps there is scope for a workable multilateral approach. But this solution has not been found.

    Thus, it appears that political success and sound policy will be at odds until and unless quite significant cultural change sweeps the Australian electorate.

    Is this a generational issue?

  24. John D

    It is worth noting that South Aus averaged 31% renewable power for 2012/13. This remarkable outcome had nothing to do with the carbon tax. It was all driven by the RET and feed in tariffs.
    In addition, the ACT solar auction system appears to be off to a successful start – another scheme that doesn’t depend on putting a price on carbon.
    The bottom line is not a price on carbon. The bottom line is a reduction in emissions.
    The Greens and Labor should be attacking the government on the grounds that it hasn’t got a credible plan for meeting 2020 emission targets. Labor/Greens should also be asking themselves whether their current policies are the basis for a credible plan. My take on Rudd’s watered down carbon price plan was that it would have had almost no effect on emissions during this term of parliament.

  25. zorronsky

    Thus, it appears that political success and sound policy will be at odds until and unless quite significant cultural change sweeps the Australian electorate.
    I should live so long ..90 in the 20’s..noo.. perhaps Global Warming disaster intervenes… still dreamin’

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dN3GbF9Bx6E

  26. Chris

    It is worth noting that South Aus averaged 31% renewable power for 2012/13. This remarkable outcome had nothing to do with the carbon tax. It was all driven by the RET and feed in tariffs.

    SA is certainly doing well in renewable power area (though we also have the highest power prices in Australia I think – we may have a lot of renewable power simply because power prices are already rhgh). But isn’t the advantage of an ETS over using a RET that an ETS puts a cap on emissions, whilst a RET can reduce them, but as long as people are willing to pay there is no limit?

  27. James of St James

    “The Greens and Labor should be attacking the government on the grounds that it hasn’t got a credible plan for meeting 2020 emission targets.”
    John D yes, that is a good line of attack.
    It is worth noting that the analysis of what constitutes a credible plan is not new, it is 10 years old in this country, and clearly a c price is a core part of any credible plan, but only a part of the plan. Other measures such as RET and others will absolutely also be needed.
    Let us also be clear that Abbott & Coalition did not with the debate over credible emission reduction plan, but rather got elected despite of their failure to win that argument. Polling in recent months have shown a big majority of people wanted more action on climate change, that more people supported the c price than opposed it, that the c price was not a high priority factor in their voting decision. What was very powerful though was the deceiptful framing of the introduction of the c price being a “lie” by PM Gillard. That was the poisonous symbolism of it, (particularly after its introduction and anyone with a brain could see the fear campaign on price impacts, which has alsdo contributed to some people turning off the previous Gov’t in the 3 year election campagin, was itself a deception or massive exaggeration at best.

    “The political reality appears to be that voters are unlikely to accept a unilateralist approach.” from Katz
    I don’t agree that is a safe assumption, based on the polling. The case just has to be argued for well, and it can be.

  28. Graham Bell

    Casey @ 18:
    L-O-L. Thanks for the promotion – what’s the salary – and the perqs too? That’s why I led with that question: I knew I would get a bite. 🙂

    Seriously though, what is your opinion of the effectiveness of the LNP attack ads? Could these same ads be used by the ALP back against the LNP well before the next election is called – or becomes very very necessary?

    Anna Winter: Nice photo. Thanks for letting us know its origin.

  29. Graham Bell

    Iain Hall @19:
    Difficult moral decisions would have to be made on that day.
    However, I wonder what would happen if many of the ALP Members had a sudden urge to go to the toilet just before the division – and had to be paired – so that Mr Abbott got his bill passed with the barest quorum possible.
    Nasty tactic for nasty people, perhaps?

  30. Graham Bell

    Aw, what a pity: back to the drawing board.

    Siding with the Abbott government on this would be very difficult to explain away in an election campaign. A lot of voters would look only at what they did and not bother with explanations of the pressures that compelled them to vote with the LNP.

  31. GregM

    James from St James are you from the St James in Victoria or the St James in Western Australia?

  32. GregM

    This is perhaps the first time a piece of Liberal negative political advertising actually worked on me. I had an immediate visceral reaction to it, a surge of anger at Rudd. But then also anger at Labor, at Abbott, at the whole situation that brought us here.

    Anna when I saw that poster at the polling place where I voted it took the wind out of me. Of itself the photograph is brilliant, showing Julia Gillard in a tender embrace with Kevin Rudd. And with it the word REMEMBER. A word which left the viewer to conjure up whatever memories were theirs and the emotions associated with them. Mine were of sadness at the opportunities lost and of an excellent Prime Minister who would no longer sit in Parliament.

    I think that the poster will go into the political lore of Australia for its subtle and devastating effectiveness.

  33. Ootz

    Brilliant post Anna Winters, thank you.

    May I suggest “… a display of genuine belief obligation that we must take collective, serious action against climate change. To honour our ancestors who did their best for us to be here and to ensure future generations to enjoy life.

  34. Graham Bell

    Re what Katz @ 25 and James of St James @ 29 said:
    There is indeed generational change …. and it is ripe political fruit ready for picking.
    It is still on the tree because the ALP was too busy beating itself up in vanity contests and factional brawls.
    It is also still on the tree because the LNP has locked itself inside the Temple of Howardism …. and because The Greens have well-and-truly lost its way, despite having an outstanding leader in Christine Milne.

    Australia can show the world is “tough” (which should suit the LNP, etc.) and “progressive” (which should suit the ALP , The Greens, etc.) by going it alone on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, by pioneering new ways of managing energy use and new ways of using existing technology.

    All the money-money-money arguments against Australia going it alone stink of cowardice and lack of vision – beside becoming irrelevant if the mean temperature goes up another 3 degrees or so. Australia would not be lonely for long because the rest of the herd would change direction and follow us – out of fear of losing money by being left behind.

    There are political rewards aplenty for boldness and for vision – but whoever wants to win those rewards had better move swiftly or miss this golden opportunity.

    Su @ 24; Poignant? Yes but only at present.
    JohnD @ 23: My oath! That’s why I think this photo will come back and maul the LNP.

  35. Malcolm

    Great post, Anna

    I can’t accurately judge how I would have responded to this poster had I viewed it at a polling booth because I did not see it in that environment -it was not one of the posters that I saw on display when I cast my ballot at a pre-polling facility. Somehow, seeing a picture of the poster on a left-leaning blog (great photography by the way) has not had the same impact on me. And, immediately upon viewing the poster, I knew the context in which the photograph had been taken without even having to read down the page so perhaps that took some of its edge off for me. And, since the opening words of Anna’s article that ran alongside the picture indicated to me that it was Liberal advertising, that may have also influenced my initial impressions of this poster.

    But I can see how it is a powerful and effective piece of political advertising and I agree that it works somewhat as a Rohrschach test from the perspective of whoever sees it. I could see how, in a different context, I could have viewed this picture from my own emotional perspective. It could have invoked the same initial visceral surge of anger at Gillard from me that Anna felt against Rudd. It could have reminded me of all the lost opportunities and potential that the last six years had if only the two players had been able to work together constructively. But I suspect it could have also evoked positive feelings toward Labor in me -because I know the context in which the picture was taken, it could have reminded me of Labor’s record of positive achievements and the intellectually dishonest and morally bankrupt campaign that Abbott got away with running against good policy. So I agree -yes, this is a great bit of campaigning

    That photo can either be interpreted as representing the worst of Labor (personality politics, factional games and the like) or representing the best of Labor (successful policy-making and unveiling a positive visionary blueprint for Australia’s future). Let’s hope that Labor places a greater emphasis on the latter and no emphasis on the former from now on.

    Yes Tony, game on

  36. Armagny

    A careful mockup of Abbott punching the wall next to a woman’s head might have been a suitable riposte. But, yet, there was no getting away from the mutually applicable taint this few years of vicious internal combat and treachery left. So easy, in the end, to encapsulate and mock…